Alfred Hitchcock

To Catch a Thief (1955)…

To_Catch_a_ThiefI’m really (gosh…I’m embarrassed to admit) a newbie when it comes to things Hitchcock, so, any excuse will do to increase my repertoire…this time…Grace Kelly. Ah, I absolutely love her performances. Hence To Catch a Thief for Maddy’s Blogathon.

She’s Frances, who, together with her rich widow mother, is holidaying on the French Riviera where a jewel thief is at work. Here too we find, supposedly “former” or “retired”, jewel thief John Robie aka The Cat (Cary Grant). Naturally, suspicion falls on him. Even his former gang believe he is back in full swing of things ruby and such. However, John really is “clean” and sets out to find out the copycat Cat (ha ha, that wasn’t intended). Along the way he, or is it the other way, Frances, fall(s) in love…with each other, of course. And…yes, the identity of the roof-top-sneaking-burglar is revealed.

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But, it isn’t only the actors that count here. The story is, as usual, so clever. Tied up with some great cinematography and a perfectly fitting score (I think there’s a distinctive sound to Hitchcock soundtracks), the resulting movie is worth a watch. Having a weakness for romance (in non-romance genre movies), I quite enjoyed this who-dunnit. Even though I started having my own suspicions as to who was who…

This was to be the last of Grace Kelly‘s movies with Hitchcock and sadly, one of the last few movies she made at all.

Now, I guess it is about time I tackle the famous Psycho or The Birds…I suspect there is no romance there…

Maddy, thanks for hosting this Blogathon (more entries here) and getting me to watch more of these wonderful oldies.

I still like Spellbound the best (here). My thoughts on Notorious can be found here. And I’ll always have a special place for Grace Kelly as Amy Fowler Kane in the brilliant High Noon (here).

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First Impressions of…Spellbound

I’ve been anticipating Spellbound (1945) for quite a while now pretty much for Gregory Peck but also because I’ve been wanting to see who Ingrid Bergman is (soooorrrrryyy if you are in shock that I’d never seen her. And yes, that means I’ve haven’t seen Casablanca either but that will change soon). You’ll most likely be shocked to know that I’ve never seen an Alfred Hitchcock movie either. Shaking your head in disbelief?

I’ve rectified all that as of yesterday evening.

For those of you who don’t know the story, here you go: Dr Constance Petersen (Ingrid Bergman) is a psychiatrist who falls in love with the new Doctor “Dr Edwards” (Gregory Peck). However, she soon learns that things are not what they seem and that the new doctor is actually an amnesiac imposter who has periodic “attacks” triggered by certain visual cues. Determined to get to the bottom of this and convinced that he is not a murderer or dangerous, she risks her career and safety until the truth comes out.

So, what are my first impressions? Well, I thoroughly enjoyed the movie. Not sure what I was expecting but, as is usually the case, not this. I think I may have expected this high-tension thriller with (subconsciously) some birds thrown in together with some screaming shower scene. Instead, I got a suspense movie that had just enough tension and a great story (including some romance). Despite anticipating the ending, or at least, the outcome, it wasn’t all that obvious and I was kept wondering the whole way through as to how it would unravel.

I’m biased when it comes to Gregory Peck whom I always enjoy watching, but I really like/d Ingrid Bergman. Can’t believe I’d never watched her before. I’m going to give more of her roles a go and definitely more Alfred Hitchcock too.

Nominated for 6 Oscars, the only win went to Miklós Rózsa for Best Music, Scoring of a Dramatic or Comedy Picture. This is definitely deserving because the music was actually one thing that stood out for me while watching. Yes, it built up tension (as it usually does), but it was also a comfort mechanism for me because it noticeably preempted the upcoming scenes. This meant I could relax a bit, knowing this wasn’t the end of Constance.

A great movie. Definitely one I’ll watch again.

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