Western

Movie Rob’s Genre Grandeur: The Magnificent Seven (1960) (Western)

For this month’s next review for Genre Grandeur – Westerns, here’s a review of The Magnificent Seven (1960) by Catherine of Thoughts All Sorts Thanks again to Catherine of Thoughts All Sorts for choosing this month’s genre. Next month’s Genre has been chosen by Sean of SeanMunger.com We will be reviewing our favorite Nautical Film. “Loosely defined […]

via Genre Grandeur – The Magnificent Seven (1960) – Thoughts All Sorts

Or read it here…

(more…)

Movie Rob’s Genre Grandeur: Open Range (Western)

For this month’s next review for Genre Grandeur – Westerns, here’s a review of Open Range (2003) by Catherine of Thoughts All Sorts Thanks again to Catherine of Thoughts All Sorts for choosing this month’s genre. Next month’s Genre has been chosen by Sean of SeanMunger.com We will be reviewing our favorite Nautical Film. “Loosely defined […]

via Genre Grandeur – Open Range (2003) – Thoughts All Sorts

Or read it here…

(more…)

Movie Robs’ Genre Grandeur: Broken Trail (Western)

For this month’s first review for Genre Grandeur – Westerns, here’s a review of Broken Trail (2006) by Catherine of Thoughts All Sorts Thanks again to Catherine of Thoughts All Sorts for choosing this month’s genre. Next month’s Genre has been chosen by Sean of SeanMunger.com We will be reviewing our favorite Nautical Film. “Loosely defined […]

western

via Genre Grandeur – Broken Trail (2006) – Thoughts All Sorts

Or read it here…

(more…)

The Scalphunters (1968) – Fun Western

Burt Lancaster teams up with Ossie Davis, Telly Savalas and Shelley Winters in this comedic Western directed by Sydney Pollack.

Fur Trapper Joe Bass (Lancaster) is travelling with his latest haul when he is stopped by Kiowa Indian Two Crows (Armando Silvestre) and a group of his men who “trade” Bass‘ furs for their captured slave Joseph Lee (Davis, who was nominated for a Golden Globe in this role). Highly educated and very professional, Joseph Lee and Joe Bass, who can’t even write his name, head off to get the furs back. What they don’t count on is Jim Howie (Telly Savalas) and his band of scalphunters relieving the Kiowa of both the furs and their own hair. Through circumstance, Jospeh Lee ends up with Howie and Joe Bass continues his fur-retrieval efforts alone.

scalphunters3Davis definitely deserved the Golden Globe nomination for Best Supporting Actor for this one. He is absolutely fantastic as the former house slave heading for Mexico, now claiming to have “full Indian citizenship” (He was property of the Comanches before the Kiowa got him). Watching him interact with Lancaster and Savalas is absolutely wonderful. And who better than Shelley Winters as Kate to contrast Savalas as his wife/partner. Oh what a wonderful ensemble who seem to gel so well together.

scalphunters

Even music, courtesy of Elmer Bernstein, adds so much character to this movie. From the opening credits (which are likewise well done), to the end, aurally, it is a pleasure, with the main theme sticking in your mind long after you’ve finished watching. In fact, the theme is one of the things I clearly remembered now after not having seen this for a good 15 years.

scalphunters8

So, fun Western. Keep a lookout for Burt Lancaster‘s circus background coming through in a “oh really?” moment near the end.

Head on over to MovieRob for his monthly Genre Grandeur series which is the Western genre this month. I’ll be sending my Grandeur-worthy entries to him for publishing at the end of the month.

Save

Save

Save

Save

The Man Who Loved Cat Dancing (1973)

I’ve had a “love-hate”, hmmm, that’s a bit too strong… rather a “like-dislike” relationship with this movie ever since I can remember watching it. I go through phases where I like it and then dislike it. Having re-watched it again last night, I’m leaning towards the “like” this time round. And I can’t put my finger on what it is that keeps swaying me.

Catherine Crocker (Vera Miles) is running (riding) away from her husband, Willard (George Hamilton) when she inadvertently comes across Jay Grobart (Burt Reynolds) and his gang in process of carrying out a train robbery (the reasons for which will become revealed as the story unfolds). As they flee the scene, Jay tells one of his gang members to capture her horse, however, despite being a “prim and proper” lady, Catherine refuses to give up beautiful steed, so is taken along too. manwholovedcatdancing2Jay, while being tough with his gang and Catherine, is also the one to ensure she isn’t abused by two of his men, Billy and Dawes (Bo Hopkins and Jack Warden respectively), at every lust-filled chance they get. With railroad detective Harvey Lapchance (Lee J Cobb) and his posse, joined by Willard, hot on their heels, they make for Indian territory. As they go, the gang starts coming undone, Jay‘s motivations become clear and Lapchance starts doubting Willard.

manwholovedcatdancing3Based on the novel by Marilyn Durham, directed by Richard C. Sarafian and music by John Williams, I don’t think it a bad movie. In fact, I enjoy watching Catherine Crocker‘s change from side-saddle, umbrella-carrying lady to one who wears pants and takes a stand where needed. I also enjoy Jay‘s kind side. I can’t really pinpoint why I sometimes don’t enjoy it…but could be that every now and then Catherine comes across a bit “needy” or “clingy”. But then, riding off into the unknown from your life of luxury to be taken along with a gang of outlaws, I don’t know how I’d react. Could also be that Willard doesn’t seem to show enough conviction in tracking her down. On the other hand, I quite like that ‘romanticised’ notion of a lady riding with the men.

manwholovedcatdancing5

Jay is the “The Man who Loved”, but who is “Cat Dancing”? I guess you’ll need to watch this one to find out. It may not be easy to obtain this DVD though – the only way I got it was through the Warner Archive Collection’s Burn on Demand offering at quite a price. But then, I’m glad I got it as it forms part of my collection of movies that I used to watch on Super 8 reels. Thus, this probably becomes a better movie to me purely because of the nostalgia and memories associated with it.

manwholovedcatdancing

Not the Grandeur-worthy one that I’m looking for in this month’s Western genre over at Movie Rob‘s Genre Grandeur series. But definitely not bad. I have watched it more than once, after all.

 

Save

Save